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How to convert classic fitting techniques from real world to CLO

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  • yolaine

    Hello, 

    it's actuallly pretty easy to do that. You simply need to select your pattern piece with the transform pattern tool. You'll see a box with small dots all around and one in the middle. Double clic on the one in the middle to turn it orange and from that you can move this dot anywhere you want and it will be your new pivot point. :)

     

    Hope my explanation is clear. 

    Have a nice day 

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  • janglesworthy

    hey thanks for the reply, one problem I'm having is after I rotate a pattern and trace the arm hole with an internal line, then rotate the pattern to the next position to trace the second line, all internal lines move with the pattern. Is there a way to leave them behind and make them independent from the pattern you trace?

     

    here is an example of what I mean

    A. Mark point

    B. Rotate, trace line

    C. Rotate trace line

    D. Trim

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  • yolaine

    Hello, 

    From what I know, you can't make internal lines independente.

    But If you want (in your D picture) to have the blue lines matching your red lines which are supossed to be internal lines, just select them, right clic and cut. 

    I'm not sure that I really understand what you said so if I explaining something wrong, I'm sorry :/ 

    Tell me if it's ok for you 

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  • janglesworthy

    What I really want is to be able to duplicate curves(not offset I don't want to change the measurement or shape) and have them be independent from the pattern. The picture is showing how I want to be able to change the pattern in the bust with out changing the arm hole. So I tried to recreate the pivot technique. Since I can't duplicate a curve and rotate it freely from the pattern this technique fails.

    I just wish clo had better curve tools. Having the ability too freely create curves with out them being part of pattern would be a big help.

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  • yolaine

    Ok still not sure to but I'm gonne try to show you something else. 

    Select your line offset it of 0,10cm, then use the transform pattern tool to just select your internal line created, active and move your pivot point.

    Once you've done that move back your internal line on your original line and pivot your line. 

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  • janglesworthy

    I kind of figured out a solution. Clone as internal shape twice and I can get the two curves in the right placement that way, then trim. See how the arm hole doesn't change shape or measurement. I'm trying to find a more clean solution. Thank you for the help yolaine

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  • ottoline

    Maybe best to use the fulness and cut-slash approach. Most derivative patterns from blocks are made using that approach, (traditional drafting) and CLO3D does cater for this > then the drafting line is automatically converted into a baseline (blue line) reference as you work. You can also set the pattern points for the type of polyline calculation you want. eg: curve or line segment. That would be the typical pattern making drafter approach using CLO3D (which has tools for this).

     

    When you lay internal line you can convert them to baselines on the pattern piece (drafting reference lines) and then the auto-drafting assistant will then also snap automatically to these lines as you cut and slash the block pattern and rotate out the parts where you want to add ease, rotate, or fan out. So a pattern maker would typically lay their baselines reference lines then start the pattern piece development process - as the autodrafting assistant will then use those points and angles as autosnaps. So if you don't lay them, you cannot get that benefit, which is maybe your workflow fault to start with - no reference baselines are laid down like you would do in typical pattern drafting (which is an old school approach still used in modern CAD drafting). 

     

    The two CLO3D tools are developed for this purpose (Fullness point and line, along with the other editing tools missed ) > so you should maybe relook at the manual and explore your drafting workflow to work around the correct drafting procedure, and CLO3D tool features otherwise you are maybe using a 'hack' rather than correct process to get from A to B.

    Using the cut slash tools will also speed your block development workflow as the adjustment also includes the auto-redrafting of the pattern piece (with reference baselines) automatically placed in as you expand, or reduce, cut + slash, rotate polyline edge details of your pattern piece. That is a far faster and better workflow to explore, and is typical of how a modern CAD system takes advantage of old school pattern development process done on the pattern makers table using card or paper.  

    Time to relook at your drafting process and also explore the manual a little deeper.

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  • janglesworthy

    Thanks for the info ottoline, this is exactly what I was asking about how to convert real world techniques into clo and what those tools are.

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  • janglesworthy

    So I figured out the answer to my question is to clone as internal shape, and use divide internal point to break the curves apart and be able to independently rotate them with out rotating the pattern.

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  • ottoline

    That's right well done, you can also 'walk' a mating pattern piece edge length to make sure any cut and slash opened out patterns fit the exact length as you work. And then you can lay internal lines and change them into base lines (blue) so they act as reference lines for the auto-drafting assistant. So it reads like you are well on your way to finding drafting techniques to get you along the cut+slash approach to pattern development. 

    Another associated tool that is handy is the draw on avatar using the curve and straight line to mark out a pattern shape on the body, then place in some short dart (closed) lines and flatform it into an developed flat 2D pattern from the 3D window. That can give you some quick drape shapes. Which is an old tailoring workflow, that you can use to mark out basic blocks on avatar body shape. I often use that approach when scanning a human client for made to measure, to get a tailored fit and a custom client block quickly, then use cut and slash workflows on that new custom block to develop out the style variants. So although CLO3D/MD is digital drafting for the 21st century it plugs in extremely well to those whom have traditional pattern making skills.

    Good luck, enjoy your learning journey.

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  • janglesworthy

    Hey ottoline, thanks for the feedback. I've actually been playing with the 3d pen tool for creating boots. I sculpted a shoe last took into clo and use that as my avatar for experimenting shoe/boot making.

    I've also been experimenting with using it to practice creating recreating costume by hand modeling the cloth in zbrush then tracing it out in clo vs the import uv method.

     

    following boot making techniques I came up with this as my first test. using 3d pen to pull patterns for the shoe last avatar the way a cobbler does.

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  • ottoline

    You can actually import a shoe 'last' into CLO3D as a avatar and use that model to draw on all your design construction lines. And then you can unfold that into a set of shoe patterns, just like traditional shoe making and Shoe CAD.

    I did a tutorial on that over on the MD forum about 3 years ago, but they updated their forum and all that media is now gone. I will have to try and haul out some of the old images, but for shoe making using CLO3D you can simply import a classic 3D shoe last former and draft on that object and unfold the pattern shapes. I used to have a studio in London on Britannia row with some of the best hat and shoe designers/milliners either side of me and we all used to swap design techniques and skillsets, which I still use today but inside the 3D environment. So you can pretty much get CAD shoe making happening in CLO3D very simply, I do it all the time.

     

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  • janglesworthy

    Hey ottoline, yeah that's what I did with those boots. I scanned a shoe last, then used that as my base to sculpt out the shape of the boot, imported that into clo trying two different things. 

    1. I tried uvmapping the last then importing as avatar and importing again as a garment tracing uv's. Freezing the sole so that pattern would wrap around and stay in place. But it even dropping the collision to 0 I was still getting gaps between the last and the pattern.

    2. I tried straight importing the last and using the 3dpen to extract patterns which at the time my pattern control wasn't good so the results were not as clean as importing and tracing uv's.

    The problem was which technique to use to wrap the pattern around the last and keep it in place.

    On a side not I posted my shoe lasts on myminifactory as free downloads to use as clo avatars or for 3d print. These were made as research for trying to reverse engineer these movie boots and recreate them in clo to see if I could save time simulating boots vs hand sculpting them.

    3D Printable Jedi Boot shoe Last v0.6 by jangles (myminifactory.com)

    3D Printable Jedi Boot Shoe Last v0.5 by jangles (myminifactory.com)

    3D Printable Jedi Boot Shoe last V0.7 by jangles (myminifactory.com)

    3D Printable Star Wars Padme Battle Arena Boots shoe last v0.5 by jangles (myminifactory.com)

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  • ottoline

    You can set the shoe last (avatars) collision offset as well as the fabric additional collision. the default is 3mm so you need to change that on the shoe last to be lower.

    When you flat form patterns they stay in place on the shoe model, or you can tack them onto the last. I tend to switch the gravity off so the patterns float and then to suck them into the shoe last I apply negative pressure to one side of the pattern, then raise the friction on the fabric preset and the patterns will stick like mud.

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  • janglesworthy

    were you wrapping the pattern around and under the last or tacking the pattern right at the sole line? one problem I couldn't figure out was this common overlapping fold I see in boots I was trying to figure out if I need to half sew the pattern to the sole or give it more ease to squeeze out.

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